Cinnamon Pull Apart Bread/Cake

I saw a recipe for Pull Apart Bread a while ago, but I was about nine months pregnant and working like mad so there was no way that it was going to happen.  So now that I am no longer pregnant and I stay up soooo much later (insert look of disbelief here) and have my hands free so often (insert second look of disbelief), I decided to make it finally.  We were planning a barbeque and I figured that it’s over-the-top sweetness would be good after all the saltiness of the meat.

The Pioneer Woman recently posted her version of pull apart bread using her cinnamon bun recipe.  Since I have adopted that recipe anyway and everyone likes it (a-hem younger brother who shall not be named), I figured I would try it. Also it doesn’t require a mixer to make, so any reason to have fewer dishes to wash.

Basically you follow the cinnamon bun recipe until the rolling out stage.  When it is rolled out, you just have to add more cinnamon/sugar over the melted margarine.  Then, instead of rolling it up, you slice the dough, width-wise into 5 inch strips.  Stack the slices, one on top of the other, sugar side up, until you have used all the slices.  Be careful because you will have melted margarine dripping everywhere.

Cinnamon-sugary goodness
Cinnamon-sugary goodness

Then slice your stack into six sections.  Carefully put each section sideways into a greased loaf-pan.  Let it rise and bake!

The glaze is the same as the cinnamon bun glaze, though I put a bit too much on my loaf so it was scarily sweet.  Moderation Elle! Portion control! And all of that.

Ready to go into the oven.
Ready to go into the oven.

Turned out delicious though, and the layers really did pull apart (due to all the fat in between them of course) and everyone enjoyed it, even Rocker Dude who was feeling a bit under the weather, and always prefers salty things when he is sick. Don’t worry, I made it up to him and made him a fresh pot of chicken soup the next day.

Cinnamon Pull-Apart Bread
Cinnamon Pull-Apart Bread

Try this out! Everyone has to indulge some time!

Recipe (From The Pioneer Woman): (I only used half the recipe and it made one loaf with a bit left over.)

Note: the butter can be replaced with margarine and the milk with soymilk.

Dough
2 cups Whole Milk
1/2 cup Canola Oil
1/2 cup Sugar
2-1/4 teaspoons Active Dry Yeast
4 cups All-purpose Flour
1/2 cup (additional) All-purpose Flour
1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder
1/2 teaspoon Baking Soda
2 teaspoons Salt
1 stick Butter, Melted
1-1/2 cup Sugar
3 Tablespoons Ground Cinnamon

Icing
3 cups Powdered Sugar
2 Tablespoons Butter, Melted
1 Tablespoon Maple Extract
1/3 cup Whole Milk
Dash Of Salt

To make the dough, combine milk, canola oil, and 1/2 cup sugar in a large saucepan. Heat it until very hot but not boiling. Turn off heat and allow to cool to warm (not at all hot.)

Sprinkle in the yeast and add 4 cups of flour. Stir to combine, then put lid on the pot and allow to rise for 1 hour. After 1 hour, stir in additional 1/2 cup flour, along with the baking powder, baking soda, and salt. If dough is overly sticky, stir in another 1/2 cup flour.

Place dough in the fridge for at least 1 hour to make it easier to work with.

Roll out dough onto a floured surface. Drizzle on melted butter and smear so that it covers all the dough. Mix together the sugar with the cinnamon and sprinkle it all over the surface of the dough. (Dough should look very covered.)

Cut the dough into 6 to 8 strips, then stack all the strips into one stack. Cut the stack of strips into 6 slices. Place the stacks sideways into a buttered bread pan. Do not cram the slices into the pan. (You may have a few leftover.)

Cover with a dish towel and allow to rise for 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, checking at 20 minutes to make sure it’s not getting too brown on top. It’s important to bake the bread long enough to ensure that the middle won’t be too doughy, because if it is it won’t pull apart easily. If the top looks like it’s getting too brown, cover it lightly with aluminum foil for the rest of the baking time.

Remove the pan from the oven when it’s done. Run a knife along the edges and take the bread out of the pan. Mix together the icing ingredients and drizzle over the top, allowing it to sink into the crevices. Serve warm or room temperature.

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Sin-namon Buns

Okay, so remember way back when, when I said that I was going to try and bake low-sugar and cut calories and all that? So public service announcement – this is not healthy.  Not by any stretch of anyone’s imagination is this low sugar or low fat or low anything.  But if you are going to make cinnamon buns once a year – make these – then send the extras with your husband to share with his friends in the army and don’t eat more than one!

Yum!

I have been dying to make cinnamon buns for ages, but it seemed like way too much effort and it’s very time consuming and I was worried about who was going to eat it all. Purim comes along and all my problems are solved.  I had time to bake (sort of) and a ladies brunch to bring it to so that it did not stay in the house. Rocker Dude was very upset that I chose a time to bake these when he was leaving to the army so I made sure to make him some to bring with him. (I am not going to mention that after I told him to take the less pretty pan with him, he proceeded to take the nice looking ones, but it’s okay.  It’s totally fine. :))

I used the Pioneer Woman’s recipe for these buns because it is legend across the blogosphere, and according to her, not too hard to make. You don’t even need to use a mixer!

I made the dough on Tuesday night and let it rise in the fridge over night. Then on Wednesday night I rolled out the dough and shaped the rolls.  Ree was right – these rolls are a cinch to make which is very dangerous knowledge because now I might just make them more often…

The smell of these buns baking in the oven is amazing, even to my poor stuffed nose. I held out and did not eat a single bun until Thursday morning, when I had one of the end pieces that I had baked separately. One word – Sa-weet! (Like that double meaning there?  Sweet awesome and sweet tasty? Eh?)

Cinnamon Buns - the last ones left!

For all you dieters out there, these cinnamon buns are totally worth being your treat of the week (if you are luck y enough to build a weekly treat into your diet) and to my family who keep complaining that I never make anything for them, when I come visit – these will be on the list.

Recipe (from the Pioneer Woman):

1 quart Whole Milk
1 cup Vegetable Oil
1 cup Sugar
2 packages Active Dry Yeast, 0.25 Ounce Packets
8 cups (Plus 1 Cup Extra, Separated) All-purpose Flour
1 teaspoon (heaping) Baking Powder
1 teaspoon (scant) Baking Soda
1 Tablespoon (heaping) Salt
Plenty Of Melted Butter
2 cups Sugar
Generous Sprinkling Of Cinnamon

MAPLE FROSTING:
1 bag Powdered Sugar
2 teaspoons Maple Flavoring
1/2 cup Milk
1/4 cup Melted Butter
1/4 cup Brewed Coffee
1/8 teaspoon Salt

For the dough, heat the milk, vegetable oil, and sugar in a medium saucepan over medium heat to just below a boil. Set aside and cool to warm. Sprinkle the yeast on top and let it sit on the milk for 1 minute.

Add 8 cups of the flour. Stir until just combined, then cover with a clean kitchen towel, and set aside in a relatively warm place for 1 hour. After 1 hour, remove the towel and add the baking powder, baking soda, salt, and the remaining 1 cup flour. Stir thoroughly to combine. Use the dough right away, or place in a mixing bowl and refrigerate for up to 3 days, punching down the dough if it rises to the top of the bowl. (Note: dough is easier to work with if it’s been chilled for at least an hour or so beforehand.)

To assemble the rolls, remove half the dough from the pan/bowl. On a floured baking surface, roll the dough into a large rectangle, about 30 x 10 inches. The dough should be rolled very thin.

To make the filling, pour 3/4 cup to 1 cup of the melted butter over the surface of the dough. Use your fingers to spread the butter evenly. Generously sprinkle half of the ground cinnamon and 1 cup of the sugar over the butter. Don’t be afraid to drizzle on more butter or more sugar! Gooey is the goal.

Now, beginning at the end farthest from you, roll the rectangle tightly towards you. Use both hands and work slowly, being careful to keep the roll tight. Don’t worry if the filling oozes as you work; that just means the rolls are going to be divine. When you reach the end, pinch the seam together and flip the roll so that the seam is face down. When you’re finished, you’ll wind up with one long buttery, cinnamony, sugary, gooey log.

Slip a cutting board underneath the roll and with a sharp knife, make 1/2-inch slices. One “log “will produce 20 to 25 rolls. Pour a couple of teaspoons of melted butter into disposable foil cake pans and swirl to coat. Place the sliced rolls in the pans, being careful not to overcrowd. (Each pan will hold 7 to 9 rolls.)

Repeat the rolling/sugar/butter process with the other half of the dough and more pans. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Cover all the pans with a kitchen towel and set aside to rise on the countertop for at least 20 minutes before baking. Remove the towel and bake for 15 to 18 minutes, until golden brown. Don’t allow the rolls to become overly brown.

While the rolls are baking, make the maple icing: In a large bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar, milk, butter, coffee, and salt. Splash in the maple flavoring. Whisk until very smooth. Taste and add in more maple, sugar, butter, or other ingredients as needed until the icing reaches the desired consistency. The icing should be somewhat thick but still very pourable.

Remove pans from the oven. Immediately drizzle icing over the top. Be sure to get it all around the edges and over the top. As they sit, the rolls will absorb some of the icing’s moisture and flavor. They only get better with time.